Tonight on the Write Stuff — Tropical Kiss or Miss with Liwen Ho

Therapist Olivia Chan can’t wait to escape it all—a failed marriage, a struggling practice, and her son Micah’s recent health scare. The Hawaiian getaway she planned, however, gets rained on—quite literally—by a tropical storm and the unexpected arrival of her estranged husband Matthew, who’s determined to win her back.

Forced to confront the past, will Olivia and Matt learn to love again? The fear of rejection is great, but God’s grace is greater. With the help of their son’s prayers, this marriage might just weather life’s storms and come out for the better.

Join me as I talked with author Liwen Ho as we discuss her book! You can call in at 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or click on the link here:http://tobtr.com/10166277.


An Amazon bestselling author, Liwen Y. Ho works as a chauffeur and referee by day (AKA being a stay at home mom) and a writer by night. She writes contemporary romance, both Christian and sweet/clean. She also enjoys writing about real-life matters, such as marriage, parenting and faith because truth can be as strange and entertaining as fiction. Her work has appeared in various online publications, including LiteraryMama.com and MomLifeToday.com, and she is a contributor at StartMarriageRight.com.

In her pre-author life, she received a Masters degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Western Seminary, and she loves makeovers of all kinds, especially those of the heart and mind. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her techie husband and their two children, and blogs about her adventures as a recovering perfectionist at www.2square2behip.com.

Social Media links

The Arrogance of Well-meaning People — The Parker J Cole Show

In April, my hubby and I were walking our dog one afternoon when we came upon our neighbor from a couple of blocks down the street walking her dog. I asked after her husband, who I knew had been sick for a while and she told me he’d passed away a month before. Shocked, I gave her my condolences. She talked about her husband for a few moments. Then I started to share some of my memories of her husband as we walked back to her house. Her smile as I told a particularly humorous event lit her face up. She looked beautiful as we shared in the memory.

About two months later, we walked our dog again and she was sitting outside her home reading a book. After my dog and hers greeted each other, I asked how she had been doing since her husband’s death. She said, “I should be getting over it now.” I froze for a moment and knew in an instant she may have been mimicking someone else’s platitude. It angered me. Her husband had just died TWO months ago. Was it comforting to tell a woman who shared her life with her spouse that she should be over it now?

Unfortunately, this wouldn’t be the last time I’ve heard of people, in the middle of grief, being hurt by well-meaning people. In fact, it would be several more stories over the course of this time that led me to reach out to my returning guest co-host and contributor, Gary Roe. Well acquainted with grief and loss, I wanted him to help understand that in our efforts to give comfort, we need to be so careful of how execute it. In fact, in our well-meaning attempts to help, an certain arrogance may precipitate our words and cause more harm than good.

Join me by calling in at 646-668-8485 and press 1 to be live on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/10173285.

Tonight on the Write Stuff — Tidewater Summer with Jo Huddleston

Will Rose find the solitude she seeks during her island summer or is solitude what she really wants?

A compelling story of one woman’s pursuit of restoration from physical abuse at the hands of her fiancé. Rose Marie Henley’s Great-Aunt Clara convinces Rose to spend the summer at her South Carolina beach house.

Aunt Clara’s handyman sends his nephew to repair Rose’s water heater. Last year Rose would have been excited to see his over-the-top handsome nephew, Frank Sutton. But now she doesn’t want any man in her life again.

Frank has an instant attraction to Rose. Can he break through her defenses? He’ll do anything to protect her, but will she open her heart to trust him?

Join me as I talk with Jo Huddleston, author of Tidewater Summer as we talk about romance, the South, and the 1950’s! You can call in at 646-668-8485 and press 1 to be live on air. Or download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/10166695.

 

 


Jo Huddleston is a multi-published author who writes novels inspired by her fascination with the 1950s and her love of her native American South. Novels in her endearing Caney Creek series, her West Virginia Mountains series, as well as her stand-alone release, Tidewater Summer, are sweet Southern romance novels. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and the Literary Hall of Fame at Lincoln Memorial University (TN). Visit Jo at her website (www.johuddleston.com) where you can sign up for her mailing list and read the first chapters of her novels and novellas.

Links to Huddleston Online:

Website and blog (Read novel first chapters here): http://www.johuddleston.com

Sign up for Jo’s mailing list: http://bit.ly/1ZFaZwG

Amazon author page: http://amzn.to/2cfSroU

Facebook author page: http://bit.ly/2aqFEeT

Facebook personal page: http://on.fb.me/1Ubic69

Goodreads: http://bit.ly/1QAPtFv

Inspirational blog: http://bit.ly/1QAPRnr

 

 

Write Stuff Author Spotlight — What I Gain Through His Pain with Nicole Benoit-Roy *EXCERPT*

Write Now Literary is pleased to announce What I Gain Through His Pain, by Nicole Benoit-Roy. Virtual Book Tour. August 1-31, 2018. @wnlbooktours @nicoleroy52
ASIN: B0746QSMG3

Genre: Christian Non-fiction

Nicole is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in educational leadership at Andrews University. She directs the Children Ministries Department at her church. She works as a special education teacher by day, a literature evangelist by night, and writes during the wee hours of the night. She enjoys reading and playing the piano (beginner). Nicole struggled with college writing, which lead her to eventually drop out. For this reason, one of her many goals in life is to become a best-selling author to the glory of God. Nicole and her husband, Roosevelt Roy, have been married since 1994, and are the proud parents of a handsome brown-eyed son, Nolan. They currently live in Brooklyn, New York.

In a society filled with easy Christianity and cheap grace, Nicole Benoit-Roy takes her relationship with Christ to a much deeper level. Since becoming a Christian, she has been learning about her newfound Savior, Jesus Christ. She is an educator who vows to be a student for as long as she lives. The more she learns about the cross of Christ, the more she realizes the importance of it in her life. As she meditates on His suffering, she concludes that His pain is the reason for every blessing in her life. In this book, “What I Gain Through His Pain,” she shares her story about the benefit of the cross as she expresses gratefulness for His pain.

Website| Facebook | Twitter|

Tour hosted by Write Now Literary 

Click here for author tour page


Excerpt

Something Fishy

Daddy practiced Voodoo, but even as a child I considered it foolish. During summer vacations in Haiti, the family expected my sister, my next younger brother and me to go to Lèogane. As the summer months drew to a close, my father lined up every child in the house to bathe us with a special Voodoo water made with crushed leaves.

As I got older (though not much older), I grew to detest the act and so I decided not to go on vacation anymore. I thought it ridiculous to allow myself to be bathed with stinky water. I never believed in the Voodoo stuff either. I had a good sense of who I was since early childhood. I knew God made me, and no evil could harm me (Now I know evil can’t touch me without His permission). That knowledge made me very bold and never afraid of any Voodoo stuff. My father had a special table with a white small washbasin and other Voodoo items on it. No one was supposed to touch them. However, on many occasions, I pretended to be cleaning just to touch and rearrange everything on that table. I held no fear. I just knew they lacked any authority over me. It’s weird though, no one told me that Voodoo held no potency. It was always a gut feeling. I was always very bold about expressing my belief every chance I got.

My father use to hold Voodoo ceremonies where kids in the house were expected to eat out of special wooden bowls. All that I shunned eventually. Because my brother Kesnel and sister Carol were twins, the ceremony held every year honored the twins (a Voodoo ritual) even though Carol died as a baby. Those were the kinds of things that made no sense to me, leading me to refuse to take part in them as soon as I grew old enough to say no. With me so hardheaded and strong-willed, no one in my family could force me to take part once I said no. Not even my father.

On one occasion, something terrible happened in my family, causing my father to be the focus of suspicion. I felt his pain afterward. He needed so much to have someone on his side. Unfortunately, not even his favorite little girl was willing to be that someone.

In desperation, one evening in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, he pulled me aside. In a private conversation, he explained his own version of the incident after he visited my mother in the U.S. in 1982 for the first time.

He said, “Nicole, I know you’re getting older. You can understand what I’m about to tell you.”

I was 14 years old then.

“When I went to New York,” he continued, “I swear I did not take your mother’s soiled panties. It’s only after I came back to Haiti I saw them in my suitcase. I swear I did not take them.”

I listened attentively, but my eyes stared at the cement floor as we sat on the edge of my bed.

“You believe me, don’t you, my girl.” He held onto my left arm as if begging me to say yes.

I’d heard the rumor that he wanted to use her underpants to hurt my mother through witchcraft so often that I’d already made up my mind of his guilt.

My father returned to Haiti finding himself in an awkward predicament. At that age, I was naïve and awfully honest.

“Well, I can’t say whether you did it or not. I wasn’t there. You’re the only one who knows if you did it or not,” I said.

Suddenly, the look he gave me told me he wanted another answer. His eyes turned red. His pain turned into hatred.

I knew then I was not his favorite little girl anymore and I would pay.

In retrospect, I realized I could have answered differently had I known better. I still feel his pain even now as I write about it.

As soon as my mother found out her panties were missing, she demanded that my father purchase a plane ticket and return them to her.

When he did, she burned them in his presence.

My father continued to make his regular weekly visits from Lèogâne bringing us fresh produce every time. Our relationship was never the same, however. At times, I’d purposely stayed away to avoid seeing him altogether, not showing up until after he left. He was the enemy of the family. He knew it. That made him very uncomfortable and angry.

During one of his visits, he threatened to beat me because I did not greet him. Of course I put up a fight. He tried to pin me to the ground. I escaped from his grip and ran to a nearby stony hill. I picked up a stone and made the motion to throw it at him, but an invisible power stopped me. I knew Who kept me from flinging the stone, and I’m glad He did. Deep down inside I really loved my father. I believed that he gave me so much love and attention that he made it possible to never feel insecure about myself.

During my college years at Stony Brook University in New York, our father-daughter relationship remained broken. I recall lying on the bed in my dorm room reminiscing about my childhood. My entire family lived in the U.S. by then. My mom and dad separated shortly after the panties incident, although they waited to divorce until eleven years later. I finally realized the pain my father must have gone through to have his whole family against him, and the pain he continued to feel every time he and I met.

“Look at Nicole, the daughter I loved so much. Now, she can’t even talk to me,” he sometimes said.

At that time, we were on greeting terms. As I empathized with my father, I decided to put an end to our broken relationship. I picked up the phone.

“Hello,” he said.

“Hi, daddy, how are you?” It felt uncomfortable saying “daddy” but I also realized that doing the right thing was never easy.

“Who’s this?” he asked.

“This is Nicole,” I said. “I just call to tell you that I love you. Bye.”

“Ok,” he said.

I hung up the phone, feeling a burden lift from my chest.

For the first time I began to understand the power of forgiveness. I still had a long way to go.

Our relationship continued to improve after that phone call. My father is now ninety-two years old, and I love him as if nothing ever happened between us.

The Bible says in Deuteronomy 5:16, “Honor your father and your mother, as the LORD your God has commanded you.” (NLT). I desire to obey God’s Word. Through this experience, I learned that making mistakes is what we (humans) specialize in the most. What’s essential is that we learn from them.

Fasting and Prayer — The Parker J Cole Show

Parker J Cole BannerFasting and prayer are two things that go hand in hand. When we fast, we sacrifice something which we cling for whatever reason. Food, drink, habit, etc. When we fast, we give up the thing we rely on for self-satisfaction.

More importantly, we give up the thing that separates us from God.

That’s right — The IT which builds a wall between Jesus Christ and me. The thing which I hold onto because letting go is hard to do. Jesus made it clear that some things we hold on to can only be overcome through fasting and prayer. Why is that?

Let’s find out on the show with my guest co-host and contributor Danyelle Scroggins as she highlights her book, 40 Days of Healing. It is a journal to help us heal through fasting and prayer. You can call in a 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/10172805.

Write Stuff Author Spotlight — Maybe by Joy Avery

Write Now Literary is pleased to announce Maybe, Book Blast Tour with Joy Avery. August 3, 2017. @wnlbooktours @authorjoyavery

Genre: Contemporary Romance

ASIN: B072VJ9P6K

About The Book

Sometimes, all it takes is the right motivation…

Artist Rana Lassiter has sworn off men. After being hurt, she prefers painting passionate scenes of love on her canvas instead of the real thing. But when she meets Mount Pleasance’s newest arrival, sexy and suave fireman Dallas Fontaine, she envisions a different kind of stroke than the ones she performs with her brush. To say she’s attracted to the debonair man is an understatement, but she refuses to fall victim to his good looks, charm or persistence.
Dallas has never had a problem getting any woman he wants. And he wants Rana. In a way he’s never wanted any woman before. There’s just one problem…she doesn’t want him. But she will. By the time he’s done, she won’t be able to resist his blazing kisses.
But nothing is easy, especially love. When a life-altering event occurs, it will test them both. Are they strong enough to forge through the catastrophic storm, or will they allow it to destroy their chance at happily-ever-after?

Rana’s eyes slid briefly to the lime green box in Dallas’s hand. “What are you doing here?”

“I know you don’t care much for flowers, but I got the impression you really like cupcakes. Mainly because you threatened to stab your sister in the hand with a fork if she claimed the last lemon one at dinner the other day.”


About The Author

By day, Joy Avery works as a customer service assistant. By night, the North Carolina native travels to imaginary worlds–creating characters whose romantic journeys invariably end happily ever after.
Since she was a young girl growing up in Garner, Joy knew she wanted to write. Stumbling onto romance novels, she discovered her passion for love stories; instantly, she knew these were the type stories she wanted to pen. Real characters. Real journeys. Real good love is what you’ll find in a Joy Avery romance.

Joy is married with one child. When not writing, she enjoys reading, cake decorating, pretending to expertly play the piano, driving her husband insane, and playing with her two dogs. Joy is a member of Romance Writers of America and Heart of Carolina Romance Writers.

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Tour hosted by Write Now Literary 


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Tonight on the Write Stuff — The Wrath Series with Sean T. Smith

Objects of Wrath
After the bombs rain down, the entire world is an open wound; it is in those bleeding years that William Fox becomes a man. William flees with his family to Magnolia, a farm in Tennessee, while America descends into madness, anarchy, and death. With the aid of elite Special Forces units, Magnolia emerges as beacon of hope and stability. But evil is hungry and relentless. A new threat stalks the Earth. To save his people, and perhaps all of humanity, William must be more than a lethal soldier; he must become a hero. Sometimes, the only way to defeat darkness is to become it.

 

 


Children of Wrath
The Fall brought mankind to its knees. After the world war, anarchy reigned across what was once the United States of America. For nine years, William has lived a quiet life in the west. When Tarantula spreads further north, the tenuous peace between territories is threatened. Gideon, a man who believes himself to be a prophet of God, triggers a war. William is propelled into battle again, fighting for his own life and the lives of those he loves the most.. As events spiral out of control, Gideon’s madness threatens to consume the world. William will battle his own demons and an insidious evil he cannot understand. How can light defeat darkness when the darkness comes from within?

 

 


Wrath and Redemption
Is it worth losing your soul to save the world? New America gathers its defense against the Tsar’s forces, while four heroes embark on a journey more perilous than they ever imagined. Will mankind find a way to end the cycle of violence at last? To do so may cost William, Crystal, and Ryder everything…because evil never surrenders. It must be destroyed.

Join me as we catch up with my return guest Sean T. Smith and his series. Call 646-668-8485 & press 1 to be on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/10165137

 

 


It’s been a joyous, magic, tragic, and ultimately rewarding journey. He’s hiked much of the Appalachian Trail, slid down glaciers in the Rocky Mountains, gotten very lost in the Everglades back-country, and fished for Marlin in the Gulf Stream. He dove wrecks in the Caribbean, speared fish with sharks and blood in the water, and drank beer in foreign ports with fellow vagabonds, troubadours, and misfits. He lost his faith and love, yet thankfully they found him again.

Sean majored in Political Science at the University of Florida, then moved to Nashville to pursue a career in songwriting.

He started writing fiction after moving back to Florida, and now relishes the broader canvas a novel affords, though he”s still known to pick up his guitar from time to time. He considers being a dad the best thing about him, for his children make him a better man.

Sean is almost finished with his fifth novel, and already working on number six. At the same time, he is writing for an international video game developer for THE SEED, to be released in 2016 He enjoys interacting with readers, and is easy to find on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, LinkedIn, Instagram, and his blog at seantsmithauthor.com.