Tonight on the Write Stuff — Sister Eve, Private Eye with Lynne Hinton

Sister Eve knows God moves in mysterious ways. And Eve adores a good mystery. Especially a murder.

Two decades into her calling at a New Mexico monastery, Sister Evangeline Divine breaks her daily routine when a police officer appears, carrying a message from her father. Sister Eve is no stranger to the law, having grown up with a police captain turned private detective. She’s seen her fair share of crime—and knows a thing or two about solving mysteries.

But when Captain Jackson Divine needs her to return home and help him recover from surgery, Sister Eve finds herself taking on his latest case.

A Hollywood director has disappeared, and the sultry starlet he’s been running around with isn’t talking. When the missing man turns up dead, Captain Divine’s case escalates into a full-blown murder case, and Sister Eve’s crime-solving instincts kick in with an almost God-given grace.

Soon Sister Eve finds herself soul-searching every step of the way: How can she choose between the vocation in her heart and the job in her blood?

Join me as I talk with author Lynne Hinton and her Sister Eve, Private Eye books. You can call in at 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here. Tune in!


Lynne Hinton is the New York Times bestselling author of Friendship Cake and Pie Town. A native of North Carolina, she received her undergraduate degree from the U.N.C. at Greensboro and her Masters of Divinity degree from Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California. She also studied at Wake Forest University and the NC School of the Arts, School of Filmmaking. She has served as a chaplain with hospice and as the pastor of Mount Hope United Church of Christ and First Congregational United Church of Christ, both in North Carolina. Lynne is a regular columnist with The Charlotte Observer . She lives with her husband, Bob Branard, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Visit her online at lynnehinton.com

The Truth About You — The Parker J Cole Show

 

Do you know the truth about you? Not what you think is the truth but the real, behind the scenes look of you? The way you define who you are, what is it that make you, you? Is it the culture you were born with? Is it the family you’re born into? Is it money you make or the challenges you overcome? What is the truth about you? Find out all about yourself as Steven Menking from the Amateur Society tell us all about the truth about ourselves. You can listen at 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here.

Tonight on Write Stuff — High As the Heavens with Kate Breslin

In 1917, Evelyn Marche is just one of many women who has been widowed by the war. A British nurse trapped in German-occupied Brussels, she spends her days working at a hospital and her nights as a waitress in her aunt and uncle’s café. Eve also has a carefully guarded secret keeping her in constant danger: She’s a spy working for a Belgian resistance group in league with the British Secret Service.

When a British plane crashes in Brussels Park, Eve is the first to reach the downed plane and is shocked to discover she recognizes the badly injured pilot. British RFC Captain Simon Forrester is now a prisoner of war, and Eve knows he could be shot as a spy at any time. She risks her own life to hide him from the Germans, but as the danger mounts and the secrets between them grow, their chance of survival looks grim. And even if they do make it out alive, the truth of what lies between them may be more than any love can overcome.

Join me as I talk with author Kate Breslin and her new release, High as the Heavens. You can call in at 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or, download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here.

 


81RM3TNWntL._UX250_Former bookseller-turned-author Kate Breslin enjoys life in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and family. A writer of travel articles and award-winning poetry, Kate received Christian Retailing’s 2015 Best Award for First Time Author and her debut novel, For Such A Time, was shortlisted for both the Christy and RITA awards and received the American Christian Fiction Writer’s 2015 Carol Award for Debut Novel. Kate’s third novel, High As The Heavens, will release June, 2017. When she’s not writing inspirational fiction, Kate enjoys reading or taking long walks in Washington’s beautiful woodlands. She also likes traveling to new places, both within the U.S. and abroad, having toured Greece, Rome, and much of Western Europe. New destinations make for fresh story ideas. Please visit her at http://www.katebreslin.com.

Creating Another Generation of Writers — Interviewing Young Authors

 REFLECTIONS OF THE DAY

I was honored to be invited again by the Michigan Reading Association to interview a new crop of young authors.  The MRA allowed me this opportunity last year and you can listen to the details of that experience here. If I thought for one moment I would get used to the insight and talent that came from this years crop of wordsmiths, I would be joyfully disappointed. These young authors astounded me from the youngest to the oldest. From all different backgrounds and situations, they shared a piece of themselves with each word.

Last year, my father-in-law helped with memorializing the event. This year, my husband helped me out and we decided to do video interviews.

The day started out with a leisurely drive to Grand Rapids from Detroit. We passed a number of farms and wide, open spaces as we traversed down the highway. About three hours later, we arrived at the small, bustling hub of downtown Grand Rapids.

We arrived at the Amway Grand Hotel. The experience there gave new meaning to the word ‘luxurious’. The hotel has two sides to it (like people): a traditional 1920’s inspired grandeur and a modern, contemporary side.  Walking into the hotel, the sheer vastness of the place manages to encapsulate you.

High ceilings and hanging chandeliers capture your admiration. We entered the 1920’s side of the hotel, and I was transported to that time period. I imagined men and women dressed in the attire of the day, strolling the opulent rooms halls of the hotel. I don’t travel too often, but if I did, the service at the Amway would be the yardstick I’d measure everyone else by. From the check-in staff to the bag attendant, everyone exhibited a high level of service.

We travel up to the 19th floor in the soundless elevator. As it rises higher and higher into the air,  the stellar view of the waterfront takes your breath away.The water resemble crystals under the bright glare of the afternoon sun. It’s like a bay of diamonds. Everything is simply quite lovely.

For some reason, I found it funny  the room number assigned to us was 1993. I have no idea why I took a picture of it.

After a quick stop, we travel through the hotel to find the room where I’ll be interviewing the next great writers of the century. I got quite a work out as we went around the place. I must have lost five pounds that whole weekend!


The next morning, it’s time to work and do what we can do encourage the young authors of today to continue their dreams tomorrow. Last year, the venue was at Cobo Hall, in the center of downtown Detroit. This year, at the Amway, the kids had a chance to really have one on one attention which helped to make the interview process more intimate and personal which I really enjoyed.

How inspiring to see so many kids lined up to share their stories with me! From a very smart turkey to using positive emotions for a loved going through cancer, each author brings words to enhance the day. One of the questions I asked each other was how would the encourage other kids to read. In the videos you’ll see, a common thread is the awakening of the imagination, a kindling of the mind, or releasing strong emotion. Each time I sat with them, I was so thankful to be able to a part of this. As a writer, I enjoy writing and losing myself. But this day, I lost myself in their words, their dreams, and their worlds.

As a special surprise, I talked to a good friend of mine who narrates speculative fiction stories on his podcast. I reached out to him and asked if he wouldn’t mind recording some of the pieces for the kids. He recorded some select pieces which you can hear by clicking on the link here. More will be available as he has time. Yeah!

I want to thank Karen Allmen for her coordination of the event.  It always a pleasure to have someone who really is working to help eradicate illiteracy from the state of Michigan one child at a time.

At the end of the day, I drove home, tired and yet invigorated. After all, I interviewed the next J. K. Rowling before anyone knew them!

The interviews are broken up into three links:

Part One: https://youtu.be/yfbhnZUBsS8

Part Two: https://youtu.be/aOj0Bbfh0j0

Part Three: https://youtu.be/MzfOPELyByI

 


PHOTO GALLERY

 

 


YOUNG AUTHORS GALLERY

My First Rollercoaster by Lillian Natushko
December by Jacob William Johnstone
A Day with Donuts by Ava Gedert
Emotions by Miguel Dealca
Frozen in the Snow by Natalie Schlaud
Jane’s Adventure by Ava Sherman (narrated by Nathan James)
The Wonderful Life of the Turkey by Nathan Lantzy (narrated by Nathan James)
Dyslexia Makes Me Dizzy by Emma Reich
Snakezilla by Maximilian Wisniewski (narrated by Nathan James)
The Lost Unicorn by Emma Jacob (narrated by Nathan James)
Halloween Happiness by Sophia LaBrecque
The Necklace Story by Dayvon Watts
The Secret of Ergon by Meredith Tipton (narrated by Nathan James)
What It’s Like to be Homeschooled by Karma Coleman
Sick Komix by Matthew Mitchell
Scared by Kyla Ramsey
The Day I Went Up in a Hot Air Balloon by Olivia Hayes
Friendship by Layla Williams
It’s Such a Beautiful Day by Grace Alexander
The Day of the Fire by Bria Loveday
The Beauty of a Dragonfly by Madison Wiegand
Farm Treasure by Annalise Gauthier

*Other works narrated:
Rachel Brodi Jack and the Evil KingGaret Gertsch Magic Steve and Jester Emily Dennis Haley the HedgehogTaylor Mauldin Be Unique, Like MeLucas Nguyen The Invasive Pigs

Phoenix McCreadie Sirius

Arianna Crossley Junai

 

Write Stuff Author Spotlight — Until Ray by Cheryl Robinson & EXCERPT

Write Now Literary is pleased to announce Until Ray Virtual Book Tour, with author Cheryl Robinson. June 19- July 14, 2017. 

Releasing “free” June 27 at select ebook retailers. 


Genre: Adult Fiction, Contemporary

About The Author

Cheryl currently resides in the Sunshine State with plans to return to her hometown Detroit shortly. For the past fifteen years, she has been busy writing contemporary women’s fiction. While writing is her first love, making delicious green smoothies is easily her second. She also enjoys spoiling her miniature Schnauzer and whipping up healthy meals from recipes she finds online.

About The Book

Two people in the same city but worlds apart.

Until Ray is an unconventional love story of how two young people transitioning into adulthood find each other and develop a bond that will be tested through three decades.

RAY IS LOST …
He lives in northwest Detroit with his mother. When he’s not at home, he’s either at the mall selling women’s shoes or in the club. In both places, he’s focused on one thing—picking up women. Only now he’s ready to make a change but isn’t sure how to do it.

THEN SARITA ARRIVES …
At twenty-four, she has an MBA, is a CPA, and works in upper-level management at GM. But all that success comes at a cost: she’s lonely and craves the one thing she’s never had—attention from men.
Dive into a love story filled with soul-searching drama told from two very different perspectives. Until Ray, the first book of a trilogy, is set in the mid-eighties in Detroit, where the author was born and raised.



Connect Socially

Facebook Contest # 1
Link to contest Facebook
Blog Contest # 2

Link to blog contest Meet the Characters Giveaway 
Tour hosted by Write Now Literary Book Tours www.wnlbooktours.com

June 1986

 

RAY

 “If it isn’t Raymond Saint. What’s up, man?” I hear a familiar voice coming from behind me as I pose in front of a floor-length mirror in the women’s shoe department at Hudson’s admiring the suit I just got out of the layaway at Man-oh-Man. I have two more to get out next payday.

Joseph Morris steps into my view, and I turn to face him. “Joe, man, what’s up? I haven’t seen you since we graduated.” We share a brotherly handshake. “How’ve you been?”

“Couldn’t be better, honestly. Life is real good. I’ve been in town for about a week, visiting family. I’m actually flying back tomorrow. I was just picking up a few things before I go.”

“You moved out of state?”

“Yeah, after I graduated from U of M. I’m starting my second year of law school at Stanford.”

I’m pretty sure Joe’s father is an attorney or a doctor, one of the two.

“Man, good to hear that.” Joe was part of the crowd I hung with at Cass Tech. I’ve been out of high school since 1980. Six years now. Damn, that’s a long time to still be doing nothing.

“I see you’re still staying sharp.” Joe brushes my lapel.

“Trying to.”

“So, man, what are you doing these days?”

“You know, the usual. Right now I’m just waiting for my girl.”

He nods. “Where did you end up going to school? It’s hard to keep up with everybody. Cass is so big, and we knew everybody, didn’t we?”

I place one finger up to signal for Joe to wait, and then I unclip my pager. “This is my girl paging me right now actually. I need to find her.” I’ve got to get rid of him before he finds out the truth and every Cass Tech alumni knows that the guy voted most likely to succeed is now selling shoes. Why am I in denial? I’m sure most of them already know.

“Really, that’s cool. I was on my way out. I got what I came for.” Joe raises a Hudson’s shopping bag.

“Ray,” I hear the forceful voice of a female. I turn to see Cynthia Meyers. This has the potential to get real ugly, real fast.

“What are you doing here?” My eyes lock on Cynthia, and Joe disappears— even though he’s still standing here.

“It’s a mall, not your house. I don’t need an invite.”

“You need one if you’re coming to talk to me. What do you want?”

“Why did you stop calling me and stop taking my calls?”

“Well, man, ah, it was good seeing you,” Joe says. “I’ll let you handle your little situation.”

“Little situation?” Cynthia eyeballs Joe. “I’m a lot more than that.”

Joe nods at me and quickly leaves.

“Well, why haven’t you called me?” Cynthia asks again.

“I’ve been busy.” I work my way between two of the tall clearance racks, seeking some privacy. Luckily, my manager won’t be in today. But there are three female customers browsing.

“Busy doing what? Selling shoes?” Cynthia flips one of the size-seven pumps off the rack. “Hudson’s doesn’t stay open twenty-four hours, seven days a week.”

“Please tell me why you’re here.”

“Why I’m here?” Cynthia snaps. “Because I want you to tell me why you stopped calling me.”

“Do we have to talk about this here? I’m working.”

“You won’t talk to me any other time, so yeah—we do have to talk about it here. Unless you’re ready for me to act a complete fool at your job. If I’d known you were going to act this way after we had sex, I never would’ve slept with you.”

I shake my head as I stare at her. S.omeone so pretty acting so ugly“I don’t believe that, ” I say.

“I don’t know why not!” she shouts.

“Please lower your voice,” I whisper and watch two customers walk out of the department, leaving only one woman trying on shoes. “Because you had sex with me and didn’t even know me. That’s why.”

“So?” Cynthia has a hand on her hips.

“So? All you had was my first name and telephone number scribbled on the back of an Olga’s receipt.”

SARITA

 The walls in my bedroom are still pink even though I’ve outgrown the color. They were beige when my parents first moved here in 1962. Back then, Palmer Woods only had a few black families. It’s comprised of 295 colonial and Tudor revival homes in a now-historic district. The year they moved to Palmer Woods was the same year  I was born. As a kid, I always wanted this room. After all, it has a a sun balcony, chandelier, two walk-in closets, a built-in vanity, and a private bathroom with separate bathtub and shower. But being younger, I had to settle for the smaller yellow bedroom on the opposite end of this floor until Sunniva left for Harvard in 1976, which was also my freshman year at Our Lady of Mercy High School. But now it’s no longer about this room. I’ve been back from DC for two years, and it’s time for me to reclaim my independence. I felt like more of an adult in college. I lived in an off-campus apartment with my best friend, Sharon, for all but my freshman year when I lived in the dorm, which is where I met Sharon. She was assigned as my roommate. Sharon was married back then and still is today. She got married the summer before we started at Georgetown. She’s a grown woman and living as one, while I’m in a pink room. It’s time for me to move.

Dr. Emerson is here. It’s just after ten in the morning, but he’s come to my parents’ home to pick me up for a date—my first one. Not just with him, but my first one, period. I suppose I shouldn’t be nervous since I’ve known Dr. Emerson my entire life. I also know how most doctors are—I’ll call him Dr. Emerson unless he tells me otherwise.

I hear him downstairs talking with my parents about the membership-only Detroit Golf Club that’s across Seven Mile Road, minutes from our home. They’ve finally integrated, but my daddy isn’t interested in joining. He’ll stick to golfing his way through the various courses in southeastern Michigan. I’m not surprised Dr. Emerson golfs. He probably skies too. It matches his upbringing.

I’m not ready, which is why I’m still sitting on my canopy bed with the sheer white curtains drawn meditating on 1 Corinthians 13:2–6, which are my favorite verses to reflect on. I’m so ready for love, but not any old something—true love. I scan the highlighted verses:

If I had the gift of prophecy, and if I understood all of God’s secret plans and possessed all knowledge, and if I had such faith that I could move mountains, but didn’t love others, I would be nothing. If I gave everything I have to the poor and even sacrificed my body, I could boast about it; but if I didn’t love others, I would have gained nothing.

Love is patient and kind. Love is not jealous or boastful or proud or rude. It does not demand its own way. It is not irritable, and it keeps no record of being wronged. It does not rejoice about injustice but rejoices whenever the truth wins out. Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance.

 

When I finish meditating, I set my Bible on my nightstand and rest my rosary on top of it.

My gray Norma Kamali cotton shirt dress—a different one than the one I wore when the landscaper was over yesterday—is laid across the upholstered bench at the foot of the bed. The heels of my sling-back pumps kiss on the hardwood floor in front of the entrance to my bathroom.

Would it be rude if I never made my way downstairs? My mother wouldn’t allow that. This is her dream for me. I climb through the curtains, slip on my dress, and then step inside the closet and stare at my three favorite Coach purses: the Dinky, the Slim Satchel, and the Stewardess. I can’t decide which one to take. I love each for different reasons. And I can’t narrow it down by color because all three are black. Coach doesn’t have a bunch of colors to choose from to begin with, and if I’m spending that much on a purse, I want to make sure I use it often. I’m not like my mother. Coach isn’t high-end enough for her. She prefers Gucci and Louis Vuitton. But I’ll take black, glove-tanned cowhide leather over some initials on canvas any day. Besides, black goes with everything.

“Sarita, Dr. Emerson is waiting for you downstairs,” my mother says as she enters my room.

“I know, Mother.” My hand inches in the direction of my Dinky, which is inside its own little white square of the built-in purse display.

“Well, if you know, what’s taking you so long? Not that we don’t enjoy talking to him because, of course, we do. He’s such an intelligent young man, and his parents are dear friends of ours, as you know. He likes you, Sarita, and he’s not the play type. He’s serious. He’s looking for a wife.”

“I understand, Mother.”

“What do you understand? Do you understand I’d like for you to smile at Dr. Emerson, show those great teeth, stay engaged in his conversation? He’s a very rational man.”

“Mother, I’m not stupid. I went to college. I have two degrees.” I start transferring the contents of my Stewardess into the Dinky. It can’t fit nearly as much, but all I really need are some bobby pins and a small comb in case my updo comes undone; my Fashion Fair Lip Moisturizer, my slim wallet, and my keys.

“I never implied you were stupid, Sarita. I know you’re very intelligent. I just understand how you are, and I know that you feel that once you leave work, it’s over, but everyone doesn’t feel that way. Dr. Emerson is passionate about his work, so please act as if you’re interested. Do you remember everything that I taught you about dealing with men of his stature?”

I nod. “Yes, Mother.” I’ve been around men of his stature my entire life. My daddy is a man of his stature.

“Good, because if you do exactly what I’ve taught you over the years, you will be married to Dr. Emerson by next spring.”

I sigh but not loud enough for my mother to hear. Married by next spring? What is my mother talking about? She told me that Mrs. Emerson asked if I was in a relationship and asked if it were okay if her son called me. How did we get from that to marriage? Because he’s a doctor and my mother is desperate for me to land one? But at least I’m no longer nervous. I’m ready for this date to start. Anything to get me away from my mother.

“Remember, this is not a date. This is an introduction over brunch, that’s it, so don’t make more out of it than it is.”

“I know, Mother.”

“You look beautiful, Sarita.”

“Thank you, Mother.”

“You look like the type of woman a man marries. Enjoy yourself. I know that you will.” She smiles proudly, as if her dream for me will soon be realized.

Tonight on the Write Stuff — Until I Do with T. I. Lowe

51oya4b-l-LWhat does the marriage vow to have and to hold actually mean? Mia and Bode Calder have no clue.
The estranged couple can find no answers on their own, so they turn to their friend and pastor. He presents to them a copy of their marriage vows, advising them to reassess the commitment they made to each other on their wedding day.
Through a rocky trial, where each vow presents itself in the couple’s life, Mia and Bode discover the true meaning of I do.
Join this couple as they sort out the surprisingly romantic quest to rekindle the love they grasped in the beginning, but allowed to foolishly fade.

Listen to my guest co-host T. I. Lowe and I chat about her newest book, Until I Do. Listen in at 646-668-8485. Download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, click on the link here.


71FcyQ+H43L._UX250_T.I. Lowe sees herself as an ordinary country girl from South Carolina who loves to tell extraordinary stories. Her amazing readers have made her dream of storytelling become a reality with their outpouring support of her writing.

Lowe is currently working on several upcoming novels, which include:
Until I Do
Until I Don’t
Until I Decide
The Proof of Us
Before This Day
After This Day

For a complete list of Lowe’s published books, biography, upcoming events, and other information, visit http://www.tilowe.com/ and be sure to check out her blog, COFFEE CUP, while you’re there!

She would love to hear from you!!
ti.lowe@yahoo.com
twitter: TiLowe
facebook: T.I. Lowe

Write Stuff Author Spotlight — Adunni Dares to Dream by Taiwo I Ajao

Write Now Literary is pleased to announce Adunni Dares to Dream by Taiwo I Ajao, Virtual Book Tour, June 5-30, 2017.

Genre: Historical Fiction, Kids, Youth

Author/Illustrator Bio




The Dr. Ajaos are a husband-wife, doctor-nurse team who have a joint passion for health literacy, preventative healthcare, and education for at-risk groups in the Global setting. Mrs. Taiwo I Ajao, the Author, is a Registered Nurse with a Master’s in Public Health in Maternal and Child Health, while Dr. ‘Wale Ajao, the Illustrator, is an internationally-trained medical doctor with a Master’s of Arts in Communications & Producing for Film and Video. Together, The DrAjaos intend to address health literacy via it’s most fundamental forms: using the arts of writing, entertainment, and communication to educate children and their parents. Adunni Dares to Dream is the beginning of a beautiful merger of not just a celebration of educational achievement, but also of Faith, Hope, Love and Miracles.

About The Book



Adunni Dares to Dream is the true tale of a poor African girl who just wanted to go to school. Although she was a part of a very hardworking family, Adunni just could not have the finer things in life, like school, books, & literacy. In her culture, girls were just expected to look pretty, get married and have children. But Adunni wished for something more.

As Adunni dares to dream , she inspires many others to dream too, including a handsome young man who couldn’t stop dreaming about her! So Adunni has choices to make. Does she give in to her society’s expectations? Does she chose the status quo? What are Adunni’s dreams and where do her dreams take her?

Excerpt

Whenever Adunni brought up the idea of school, somehow Mama found a way to end it. Despite the fact that she was illiterate, Mama was sharp, hardworking and very resourceful with money. Mama had married young, as was common in the culture, and she started to bear children as a teenager. It was unfortunate, however, that she experienced the loss of many of those children during childbirth. Only Adunni and her sister had survived, and Adunni wondered often about what she could have done to save those who hadn’t made it. Adunni was tearful as she remembered how her mother had nearly died last year during childbirth. Was every girl expected to get married and have children, even if it killed her? Adunni didn’t want to be like other girls: she wanted to be great! Adunni believed that to be great, she must be smart and be able to read, and learn great things. 
Amazon Link 
Tour hosted by Write Now Literary