Tonight on the Write Stuff — The Right Angle by Sherry Chamberlee

Write StuffWe’ve all heard the expression, “If you look at it from the right angle…” Usually, it depends on the situation that we’re in. If you look at it this way, it’s not so bad. Or, if you look at it from this angle, it’s worst than what we thought.

What if everything we go through we’ve been viewing through the wrong angle? The angle of human understanding and finite wisdom. So when the situation gets bad, we say, “See, if it wasn’t for that, this wouldn’t have happened.” Lets take a step back and wonder, “Am I viewing this event the right way?”
The perspective of our lives should be from God’s perspective, not ours. Yet, oftentimes, when various things happens, we tend to view it from the wrong angle.

On this episode of the Write Stuff, we’ll be chatting with author Sherry Chamberlee, author of the 4 week women’s devotional “Right Angles” as we discuss this topic about perspective. You can call in at 646-668-8485, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can download Stitcher on your mobile device. Or, you can click on the link here. http://tobtr.com/8545131. Tune in!

Right angles cover

ABOUT THE BOOK

This 4-week devotional for women offers a Bible study on maintaining those proper perspectives that line up with God’s Word.

Oftentimes in life, our biggest problem comes from the angle we’re looking at things. When we straighten out the perspectives, in our own minds, we might just see the solution readily available. That’s why our perspective should always be guided by the Bible. God’s Holy Word is the only straight angle that will keep us in the proper perspective.

We all need to periodically check ourselves to see if we’re still on that right perspective.
That’s what this book is about – a check on the angle.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

cropped author pic

Sherry grew up in various cities around northern and central California. This gave her all sorts of stories that sat and festered in her brain, waiting to be let loose. She eventually went to college in Wisconsin, where she met her equally frenetic husband, Rich. They have six (yes, count them) children, two dogs and a cat, and currently reside in a madhouse in the southern California area. As a family, they enjoy being active in their local church. Sherry spends her time writing when not caring for Granny, the kids, the dogs, the cat and any number of strays in the neighborhood.

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Tonight on the Write Stuff — Adding Realism to Your Book with Dr. Linda F. Beed

I read a historical romance set in the early 1800’s England. I enjoyed the story of the book but there were some major problems with it — it wasn’t set realistically in the 1800’s. There were words and phrases that were modern to the 21st century reader but not appropriate for the locale of the story. For someone who used to read giant, thick historical romances where the author entrenched you in the time period you were lost in, that lack of attention to detail did not allow me to enjoy it as much.

Realism isn’t just about dealing with tough subject — it’s also immersing your reader into the world. Whether it’s a ball at the Duke’s house or a Martian colony on the Red Planet, adding realism only helps to strengthen the connection the reader has with your work.

With me to discuss how we authors can do just that is Dr. Linda Beed. You can call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/s/7995757. Or, download the WLUV radio mobile app. Tune in!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Linda BeedMost who know her say that Dr. Linda F. Beed was born with a story in her mouth and a love for people in her heart.

After submitting to a short-story contest, those who read the entry convinced her that she had a work worthy of publication. Disturbed by what potential publishers wanted to turn the story into, she established On Assignment Publications and released Business Unusual. She followed that publication with Flavorful, her short-story contribution to Home Again: Stories of Restored Relationships. That compilation became a 2011 best anthology of the year nomination.

Her Gifts, book one in the Living His Love series is her first inspirational romance novella. That work will be followed by the novel Through the Fire, the second in the Covenant series.

As a conference coordinator she has shared in the success of national literary events such as Romantic Times. She also serves on the faculty of the Black Writers and Reunion Conference. Her other writing endeavors include contributions to Shades of Romance digital magazine. Dr. Linda is also the founder of ‘It’s In Your Hand’. This annual event serves to bring together entrepreneurs and those needing encouragement for the exiting business or contemplating turning their passion into a fulltime or part-time business.

A veteran children’s minister, Dr. Linda is a living example of her tagline: Using Words to Bear Good Fruit. She is a member of the Seattle/South Sound chapter of the Professional Women of Color Network and the National Council of Negro Women. In her quest to help further the education of others she is on the Board of Directors for the T&T Foundation.

Dr. Linda Beed

www.lindabeed.com

lindabonassignment@yahoo.com

Tonight on the Write Stuff — Writer’s Business Toolbox with Dr. Linda F Beed

A recurring theme in the publishing world for both independent and traditional publishers is the business of writing. Learning how to see yourself more as writer or an author and see yourself as a business person. What tools do you need in your writer’s toolbox to get started? What kind of questions should you ask? How can you take your writing career to the next level.

Join me as w give you tools for the Writer’s Toolbox with author and writer’s coach, Dr. Linda F Beed. You can call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can download the WLUV Radio mobile app. Tune in!

Linda BeedMost who know her say that Dr. Linda F. Beed was born with a story in her mouth and a love for people in her heart.

After submitting to a short-story contest, those who read the entry convinced her that she had a work worthy of publication. Disturbed by what potential publishers wanted to turn the story into, she established On Assignment Publications and released Business Unusual. She followed that publication with Flavorful, her short-story contribution to Home Again: Stories of Restored Relationships. That compilation became a 2011 best anthology of the year nomination.

Her Gifts, book one in the Living His Love series is her first inspirational romance novella. That work will be followed by the novel Through the Fire, the second in the Covenant series.

As a conference coordinator she has shared in the success of national literary events such as Romantic Times. She also serves on the faculty of the Black Writers and Reunion Conference. Her other writing endeavors include contributions to Shades of Romance digital magazine. Dr. Linda is also the founder of ‘It’s In Your Hand’. This annual event serves to bring together entrepreneurs and those needing encouragement for the exiting business or contemplating turning their passion into a fulltime or part-time business.

A veteran children’s minister, Dr. Linda is a living example of her tagline: Using Words to Bear Good Fruit. She is a member of the Seattle/South Sound chapter of the Professional Women of Color Network and the National Council of Negro Women. In her quest to help further the education of others she is on the Board of Directors for the T&T Foundation.

Dr. Linda Beed

www.lindabeed.com

lindabonassignment@yahoo.com

Call of the Writer

We hear about ministers being called to preach but there is another call waiting to be answered — the call of the Writer. There are writers dormant inside some of us that we are ignoring. As Christian fiction and non fiction authors, we have an unique opportunity to bring about the message of the gospel in unique ways.

However, how do you know if you’re the one to answer that call? How can we if that’s what God really wants us to do? How do go about setting up ourselves to be writers?

Join me as I talk with Celesta Thiessen, author and speaker as I talk about these things and many others. You can call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can click on the link here: http://tobtr.com/s/6413545. Or, you can download the WLUV Radio mobile app today. Any way you can, join us.

Back in the Day

People, in general, like to remember the way things used to be. Sometimes we may focus on how an injustice was perpetrated at one point in history. It wasn’t too long ago that women did not have the right to vote. And we all know how African Americans were considered three fifths a person. World War 2 allowed for Japanese internment camps and the near genocide of the Jewish people. History records great battles such as the mighty three hundred Spartans who fought against the Persian army. Christians around the world listen avidly to the narrative of David and Goliath.

The annuals of time are great fodder for stories. They take us back to either simpler or more violent time in human history. Wars, famine, oppression, social justice, equality, and many other events in history are woven into the fabric of our lives and we’re all affected by it. The events of yesterday often affect the events of today and the future. As writers, we have a fantastic opportunity to use history to weave yarns of intrigue, passion, mystery, and so much more.

Join me as I chat with Piper Hughuley, author and professor as we talk about writing historical fiction. You can join me by calling in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can download the WLUV radio mobile app today. Any way you can, join us.

Writer’s Clinic — Writer’s Burnout

ClinicToday is our writer’s clinic.

Our patient today: The Writer…

That’s right. You. The one who create the worlds, the characters, the drama, the highs, the lows, the ins, the outs, the fast, the slow, the mysterious, the romantic, the otherworldly, the suspenseful, the horrible, the disgusting, the…

That’s a lot of work you have to do. Your fans want more from you. Your publishers have deadlines. Your family wants your time. You’d like to eat sometime this week. I think most writers would like to have access to a deserted island with a handy teleportation system. When they want to get away for a few days, they simply teleport here, write and then return to the world. Others would probably just stay on the island without interaction from the outside world except through books

I read a post by Ted Dekker a few days ago and he made an interesting comment. He said. “Part of the journey is learning not to be enslaved by expectations of the book-world or other’s opinion of me..” Sometimes the pressure of being a writer can lead to burnout, especially when life circumstances interfere. How can a writer prevent burnout?

With me to unpack this topic is Debra Ullrick, prolific author and a recovering patient of burnout. You can call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or, you can download the WLUV Radio app on your mobile device. Any way you can, join us.

Call in at 646-595-2083, press 1 to be live on air. Or download the WLUV radio app. Or, click on the link.http://bit.ly/1ecKXGw

Any way you can, join us

The Author’s Friend — Criticism

Handling it Well

My mature reaction to criticism

I asked an established author to read my first book, Dark Cherub. It took her a while to read it but I had expected that. I had assured her that I could handle tough criticism and would use any negative feedback she gave me to better my writing career (oh the innocent lamb I was!) and would be most grateful for her input.

When I finally saw her email, I saw these ominous words: “First of all, you are a gifted writer, so remember that more than any of my other comments! I reread some of your old e-mails, and you said you didn’t mind tough criticism, so that reassures me! I have to be honest (I really grappled with what to write you), I found it hard to read your story.”

Note to self: never put lies in writing. They come back to haunt you.

The rest of the email began a gentle but strong critique of my novel which burned me.  I think I was depressed for two hours (days) or possibly a day (a week). Others had enjoyed my story so why couldn’t this wonderful, superlative, dynamic writer not enjoy my book?

No one likes to hear that the work they’ve spend sweat, blood, and tears over (although we use that adage, and we all know that if a drop of blood landed on the keyboard or paper, we’d all run to the hospital) doesn’t sound good. We want people to like what we’ve written. However, as she told me later on, reading is subjective. What one person likes another doesn’t. There has been more than one book I’ve read where I thought it wasn’t worth the paper printed on. And others I wouldn’t let anyone borrow because I love the book much.

Yet, I learned from the criticism and it did help me in my writing and I will always be thankful to her that she took time out to read it.

Using criticism in our work helps us to improve our craft. If we always hear positive things, we would never know the areas we need to improve on. In keeping with this thought, here are some of my suggestions for dealing with someone who criticizes your work:

1. Everyone’s opinion is not always a fact. The very same day I received the email, I got another one from another person who thoroughly enjoyed what I had written.

2. Listen to what is being said. If the criticism is, “It’s stupid,” you can deduce the statement is not a helpful one and then retaliate with, “No, you’re stupid!” (hopefully your critique help is weaker than you or you can run faster than them). However, if someone says, “The flow of the story seemed jumpy to me,” then you can go back to your work and see how to smooth out and transition easily from one scene to the other.

3. Join or start a critique group with fellow authors. Many authors have found this to be an essential part of the writing process. You have a fellow comrade who can give you genuine feedback on how to improve your story. Perhaps your strength is in character development and your critique partner’s is in plot structure. You can use each other’s strengths to build upon.

Don’t feel too badly if you do receive negative feedback. Use it and transform it to positive.